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Posts Tagged ‘mobilepostcross’

Augmented reality browser Junaio offers less ‘clunky’ apps, new API for developers

June 21st, 2012

Augmented reality browser Junaio offers less 'clunky' apps, new API for developers

Remember Metaio? Back in February we reported on the company’s rather neat brand of markerless augmented reality, and now it has some fresh news: a major revamp to its Junaio AR browser for iOS and Android, which incorporates the markerless algorithms and a lot more besides. The browser is an open platform for a myriad of smaller AR apps coded by independent developers, and the new version includes both a new UI and API to give those devs additional tools in HTML5 and JavaScript.

Right now, the app is worth a peek for the various curiosities demo’d after the break — such as the ability to see other people’s Instagram photos overlaid on the view from your rear camera, showing the direction and distance to the point where they were snapped. In time, though, we’re really hoping that developers will latch on to platforms like this and take AR to where it needs to be: something that lets us recognize and augment people and objects naturally and instantaneously, without pre-conceived markers. In fact, Junaio really needs to have coffee with Project Glass.

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Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8 share lots of code, NT kernel

June 21st, 2012

Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8 share lots of code, NT kernel

It’s not a complete surprise, but it’s still a little bit shocking that it’s actually happening — Windows Phone 8 will be borrowing much of its code base, including the kernel, from Windows 8. At the heart of the latest mobile OS from Microsoft is the full-fledged NT kernel. It’s not just a kernel though, the so-called “Shared Windows Core” extends to the file system, security infrastructure, etc…

The obvious benefit here is to streamline the creation of a coherent ecosystem. Developers will be able to easily create apps and drivers that can jump from the phone, to the tablet and to the desktop. Only having to write a driver once should also simplify the process of building hardware, meaning manufacturers won’t have to tailor GPU code to a phone and start again on the desktop.

They OSes even share a substantial chunk of browser code, finally bringing Windows Phone up to parity with its desktop IE progenitors. For enterprise users and IT departments, Microsoft has brought over Secure Boot, BitLocker and some serious encryption. We’d say it’s about time that Redmond finally brought all its Windows power to the mobile space.

Thanks to the sharing of C and C++ libraries, Direct X components and SQLite support, developers can actually write an app once and move it from one platform to another with only a few code tweaks. In fact, thanks to the Shared Windows Core, pretty much the only major difference for coders is screen resolution and size. Obviously, a 4-inch 720p display isn’t the same as a 1080p 10-inch tablet, but the Direct X graphics engine is — and that, friends, can make all the difference.

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Windows Phone 8 to support multi-core CPUs, HD resolutions, SD cards and NFC

June 21st, 2012

Windows Phone 8 to support multi-core CPUs, HD resolutions, SD cards and NFC

Microsoft is on stage at the Windows Phone Developer Summit offering us a bite of what’s to come in Windows Phone 8, and one of the tastiest morsels may just be the noticeably more diverse hardware it will support. The new platform won’t just support dual-core processors — it will support as many as 64 cores, should such massively parallel chips come to exist in the platform’s lifetime. Also gone is that long-criticized 800 x 480 display resolution ceiling: if phone builders like, they can either opt for the increasingly common 1280 x 720 or a rarer 1280 x 768. A few subtler feature parities are coming with the upgrade, such as NFC for tags and payments as well as a long, long requested support for SD cards beyond the crude initial expansion. All told, Microsoft just brought Windows Phone right up to hardware parity with its biggest rivals, and possibly a bit beyond.

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Microsoft introduces Windows Phone 8 for fall release, incompatible with current devices

June 21st, 2012

Microsoft introduces Windows Phone 8 for fall release, incompatible with current devices

Microsoft has finally and officially removed the wraps from the OS formerly known as Apollo. It’s now just Windows Phone 8 and, at their “sneak peek” event we’re learning a good bit about that OS, and some of the great new hardware support that it offers. But, there’s one thing we want to make clear right away: if you’re currently holding a Windows Phone device you won’t be getting a taste of this action. Well, not unless you buy a new phone, that is. That back and forth about upgrade paths has been proven to be incorrect, as the hardware requirements for WP8 preclude its running on any current WP device — even that hot blue Lumia 900 you got for a steal.

And what are those hardware requirements? Multi-core processors (up to 64) are now allowable, displays up to WXGA (1280 x 768) and external storage on SD. This better, faster hardware will enable new, faster games and other demanding apps which, for the first time, can be written in native code. (Well, it’s C/C++, which at least lets developers get out of CLR land.) All this will run on a kernel shared with Windows 8 and Windows RT. In other words: yes, Microsoft has managed to get one platform running on desktops, laptops, tablets and phones, the idea being that apps can be more easily ported from one to the next, promising “games we’ve never seen before” running on your phones.

There’s also a new wallet functionality thanks to the NFC support, but reliant on an augmented SIM, not hardware on the phone itself. This means carriers won’t have to remove apps (as we’ve seen with Google Wallet in the past) but they can block support altogether. Nokia maps is now built into the OS, including offline map support.

This is a big step forward on many levels, but Microsoft is naturally sticking to its roots, promising enterprise-ready security and support, enabling admins to deploy and restrict apps on corporate-provided phones and manage them remotely. There’s also encryption and secure booting integrated.

It’s all set to arrive this fall, which just so happens to be when Windows 8 (and those fancy new Surface tablets) will start shipping, too.

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Samsung warns Italians that Kobo is leaving the Readers Hub, teases ‘new and improved’ e-book service

June 21st, 2012

Samsung warns Italians that Kobo is leaving the Readers Hub, teases 'new and improved' e-book service

We hope you took advantage of those Italian lessons. If you didn’t, the gist is that Samsung has warned at least one HDBlog.it visitor (and Galaxy phone owner) that its Readers Hub will soon drop Kobo e-book support. While there isn’t a mentioned cutoff point, Samsung is steering the faithful to the regular Kobo app on Google Play if they want to keep reading. The company’s only explanation may be a good one: it’s promising a “new and improved” e-book service that should be ready in the near future. We’d very much like to know what that is, but until Samsung is more forthcoming with actual details, we’ll have to be content with the company’s alert-as-teaser approach to marketing.

SOURCE via Samsung

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Windows Phone Marketplace has 100,000 published apps, counts Words with Friends and Draw Something among ‘em

June 21st, 2012

Windows Phone Marketplace has 100,000 published apps, counts Words with Friends and Draw Something among 'em

It’s not quite App Store numbers, but the Windows Phone Marketplace has finally managed to break the six-digit published apps barrier (making good on the promise of all those app submissions) as Microsoft just announced that its mobile users now have over 100,000 apps to choose from. And, while it may not be as big a deal as multi-core processor support, a new Start screen, or turn-by-turn navigation, Microsoft just told of two more apps that’ll be popping up in the Marketplace soon. That’s right, a duo of Zynga’s most popular titles, Words with Friends and Draw Something, are coming to Windows Phone. Congratulations, all you Microsoft mobile aficionados, your time-wasting can now reach levels previously seen only by your iOS and Android-toting friends.

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LG launches ‘Quick Voice’ on its phones in Korea, goes head to head with S Voice and Siri

June 21st, 2012

LG launches 'Quick Voice' on its phones in Korea, goes head to head with S Voice and Siri

After Apple and Samsung have made their Siri and S Voice features keystones of recent smartphone releases, it wasn’t long before other manufacturers jumped in and now it’s LG’s turn with Quick Voice for its Android phones. Just announced in Korea and rolling out soon for various members of the Optimus family like the Vu (later this month) and LTE II (in July), it brings natural voice recognition to commonly used functions like searching, setting up appointments or pulling up videos on YouTube. For Korean users it’s even tuned to check dates on the lunar calendar, although there’s no word yet on when or if it will arrive elsewhere.

SOURCE via LG

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Nokia Lumia devices now present in 54 markets, 44 percent of Windows Phone apps available in China

June 21st, 2012

Nokia Lumia devices now present in 54 markets, 44 percent of Windows Phone apps available in China

In case you want to check Nokia’s pulse amid a mixture of good news and bad news, the company’s decided to dish out some new stats on its Windows Phones at the first-ever Mobile Asia Expo here in Shanghai. Asia region president Olivier Puech announced the Lumia devices are currently available in 54 markets worldwide, courtesy of over 130 operators and over 100,000 apps. Sadly, there was no mention of market share or sales figures, but Puech did add that since the Lumia launch in China at the end of March, only 35,000 of all those Windows Phone apps are available in the restricted marketplace, 5,500 of which are tailored for the local market. Of course, with Nokia’s constant push in the country these numbers should, hopefully, only go up, so hang in there, Elop!

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Google completes buyout of Magnolia Broadband patents, puts a little extra protection under its belt

June 20th, 2012

Google completes buyout of Magnolia Broadband patents, puts a little extra protection under its belt

Magnolia Broadband revealed that Google was buying some of its patents at the start of June, but to say that its confirmation was brief would be an understatement. It’s being more verbose now that the transaction has been cleared: Google now owns over 50 patents for beamforming wireless signals. Magnolia characterizes the techniques as important to making the best use of cellular connections, which could well be helpful to a company that just bought Motorola. Having said this, we can’t help but think that the various patent battles of Google’s recent acquisition may play a part; obtaining cellular-specific patents would give potential attackers a reason to think twice.

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CyanogenMod nightlies reach Samsung Galaxy S III, Nature UX critics unite

June 19th, 2012

CyanogenMod nightlies reach Samsung Galaxy S III, Nature UX critics unite

Let’s say you’re a fan of the quad-core processor and giant screen of the international Galaxy S III, but Samsung’s Nature UX just leaves you feeling cold. Thankfully, the first CyanogenMod 9 nightly builds have arrived to warm you up. They both bring the OS closer to the official Android Open Source Project version while adding the extras that we’ve seen before, such as theme support, an audio equalizer and gesture shortcuts on the lock screen. Nightlies are well away from becoming polished releases, so don’t be surprised if your Galaxy S III goes awry — the team is already advising starting from a completely blank slate. But if that desire to get more control over the OS is still strong enough to throw at least a slight amount of caution to the wind, the source will provide all the downloads and details needed to give Samsung’s interface the boot.

SOURCE via XDA-Developers

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