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Archive for the ‘Super Computer’ Category

Supercomputer built from Raspberry Pi and Lego, managed by humans rather than Minifigs

September 18th, 2012

Need for Speed Hot Pursuit

If you’re a computational engineer, there’s no question about what you do with the Raspberry Pi: you make a supercomputer cluster. Researchers at the University of Southampton have followed their instincts and built Iridis-Pi, a tiny 64-node cluster based on the Raspberry Pi’s usual Debian Wheezy distribution and linked through Ethernet. While no one would mistake any one Raspberry Pi for a powerhouse, the sheer number of networked devices gives the design both some computing grunt and 1TB worth of storage in SD cards. Going so small also leads to some truly uncommon rackmounting — team lead Simon Cox and his son James grouped the entire array in two towers of Lego, which likely makes it the most adorable compute cluster you’ll ever see. There’s instructions to help build your own Iridis-Pi at the source link, and the best part is that it won’t require a university-level budget to run. Crafting the exact system you see here costs under £2,500 ($4,026), or less than a grown-up supercomputer’s energy bill.

SOURCE via South Ampton

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IBM pushing System z, Power7+ chips as high as 5.5GHz, mainframes get mightier

August 6th, 2012

IBM pushing System z, Power7+ chips as high as 5.5GHz, mainframes get mightier

Ten-core, 2.4GHz Xeons? Pshaw. IBM is used to the kind of clock speeds and brute force power that lead to Europe-dominating supercomputers. Big Blue has no intentions of letting its guard down when it unveils its next generation processors at the upcoming Hot Chips conference: the company is teasing that the “zNext” chip at the heart of a future System z mainframe will ramp up to 5.5GHz — that’s faster than the still-speedy 5.2GHz z196 that has led IBM’s pack since 2010. For those who don’t need quite that big a sledgehammer, the technology veteran is hinting that its upcoming Power7+ processors will be up to 20 percent faster than the long-serving Power7, whose current 4.14GHz peak clock rate may seem quaint. We’ll know just how much those extra cycles mean when IBM takes to the conference podium on August 29th, but it’s safe to say that our databases and large-scale simulations won’t know what hit them.

SOURCE via Wall Street Journal

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IBM’s water-cooled supercomputer saves energy and helps with your heating bill

June 20th, 2012

IBM's water-cooled supercomputer saves energy and helps with your heating bill

IBM’s SuperMuc has had a good week. Not only has the three petaflop machine been listed as Europe’s fastest supercomputer, but it’s also apparently the first high performance computer that’s entirely water-cooled. Rather than filling rooms with air conditioning units, water is piped around veins in each component, removing heat 4,000 times more efficiently than air. The hot water is then used to heat the buildings of the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre where it lives, saving the facility $1.25 million per year. After the break we’ve got a video from Big Blue, unfortunately narrated by someone who’s never learned how to pronounce the word “innovative.”

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NNSA Sequoia supercomputer takes world’s fastest title, prevents nuclear testing

June 19th, 2012

NNSA Sequoia supercomputer takes world’s fastest title, prevents nuclear testing

Fujitsu’s 10.51 petaflop K supercomputer is pretty fast, but does it pack enough computational oomph to stave off underground nuclear testing? Probably — but the NNSA’s new sixteen petaflop rig does it better.

According to the National Nuclear Security Administration, a supercomputer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, dubbed Sequoia, is now the fastest supercomputer on the planet, clocking in at 16.32 sustained petaflops. “Sequoia will provide a more complete understanding of weapons performance, notably hydrodynamics and properties of materials at extreme pressure sand temperatures,” says NNSA Director of Advanced Simulation and Computing Bob Meisner, explaining that supercomputer simulations will “support the effort to extend the life of aging weapons systems.”

Translation? Sequoia will help the NNSA keep the US’ nuclear stockpile stable without resorting to nuclear testing, or put simply, more computational power, fewer explosions. We can’t think of a better thing to do with 98,304 compute nodes, 1.6 million cores and 1.6 petabytes of memory spread across 96 racks — can you?

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T-Platforms to build ten petaflop supercomputer for Moscow State University

December 27th, 2011

T-Platforms to build ten petaflop supercomputer for Moscow State University

In post-Soviet Russia, massive supercomputer programs you. Recently, Russia’s Moscow State University contracted with high-performance computing company T-Platforms to create a ten petaflop cluster that’ll be operational in 2013. The computer would fall just short of the fastest supercomputer on Earth (the Japanese K Computer, which is rated 140% at 10.51 petaflops) and will incorporate a mixture of different node types to achieve the ten petaflops. T-Platforms will reportedly build the nodes from Sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge Xeon processors and NVIDIA’s next-generation Kepler GPU coprocessors, and Intel’s Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture could also be included if it’s available during construction. The reason for the project? Unknown officially, but we’re guessing it’s just another reason for Putin to rip his shirt off and celebrate.

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In the race for the throne, they lost the wisdom

November 21st, 2011

In the race for the throne, they lost the wisdom

Top 5 supercomputers are more power hungry than ever. As expected, Japans K Computer has extended its lead in the prestigious Top500 Supercomputer list. The updated K system now has 705,024 processing cores, delivers 10.5 PFlops and consumes about 12.7 MW. For the first time, the list also includes a supercomputer that integrates a Chinese processor architecture. However, that pride comes with a huge price to pay, which is the bill.

The current Top500 list now ranks four Asian systems among the five fastest supercomputers in the world. NUDT YH MPP follows the K Computer with a performance of 2.6 PFlops. A 1.8 PFlops computer at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in third place, followed by a Dawning TC3600 system in China (1.3 PFlops) and a HP ProLiant SL390s supercomputer (1.2 PFlops) at Tokyo’s GSIC Center. Despite greater power efficiencies in microprocessors, the overall power consumption is expanding at a rapid pace: K Computer consumes 12.7MW. The five fastest supercomputers are estimated at a consumption of 27.3 MW, up from 14.8 MW just three years ago.

The November 2011 list also includes, for the first time, a computer that uses China’s Shenwei SW1600 CPU. Clocked at 975 MHz, the processor has 16 cores and debuts in a system installed at the National Supercomputing Center in Jinan. The system is ranked at position 14.

SOURCE via TOP500

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Fujitsu’s 10.51 petaflop K supercomputer is fastest in the world

November 8th, 2011

Fujitsu's 10.51 petaflop K supercomputer is fastest in the world

Fujitsu, sweaty palmed from the construction of the K supercomputer, swore the colossal machine would manage a speed of ten petaflops by the year 2012. The effort has paid off handsomely: the hangar-sized machine has a top speed of 10.51. If you wanted to duplicate that setup at home, you’d only need 864 racks, 88,128 processors and enough cash in your back pocket to front an annual electricity bill of $10 million a year. The company will be spilling all at November’s SC11 conference in Seattle, where the K will cement its position as the fastest computer in the world. One last thing — we have a hunch that this machine can just about play Crysis.

SOURCE via Nikkeibp

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China debuts homegrown supercomputer, hits one petaflop mark

November 2nd, 2011

China debuts homegrown supercomputer, hits one petaflop mark

China has already, however briefly, sat atop the Top500 list of supercomputers, but that was using silicon designed by American companies like Intel and NVIDIA. The country’s latest contestant though, is sure to be a much bigger point of national pride. The Sunway BlueLight MPP, which was installed at the National Supercomputer Center in Jinan this September, is powered by 8,700 ShenWei SW1600 CPUs — the homegrown chips that come out of Shanghai. The Sunway’s one petaflop performance isn’t enough to make it the new king of the hill, but it should get it into the top 20. More impressively, the machine only consumes about one megawatt of electricity — roughly a quarter of the 2.5 petaflop Tianhe-1A. Now it’s up to researchers to crank these ShenWei cores up to a 11 and make a run at that 50 petaflop Cray.

SOURCE via New York Times

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Nvidia powering world’s most powerful supercomputer

October 13th, 2011

Nvidia powering world's most powerful supercomputerTuesday Nvidia said that Oak Ridge National Laboratory has chosen Tesla GPUs to power a new Cray XK6 supercomputer called “Titan” for the U.S. Department of Energy’s open science computing facility located in Tennessee.

Titan will integrate 299,088 AMD Opteron processing cores (18,688 16-core CPUs) as well as 7000 to 18,000 Nvidia Kepler GPUs. The system, which is scheduled to completed in late 2012, will also integrate 600 TB of memory. ORNL said that Titan will be ready for users sometime in 2013.

Nvidia said that the new computing beast has the potential to deliver over 20 petaflops of peak performance, more than two times faster and three times more energy efficient than today’s fastest supercomputer, the K computer located in Japan. Steve Scott, the CTO of Nvidia’s Tesla business unit, added that Titan will be ten times more powerful than the current Jaguar machine. 85-percent of the computing power will come from the Tegra chips while the other 15-percent will be handled by conventional AMD CPUs.

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IBM Has Plans for a 100 PFlop Supercomputer

September 13th, 2011

IBM Has Plans for a 100 PFlop Supercomputer

According to the document, which stretches over 649 pages, IBM describes a BlueGene/Q system that is based on 524,288 processing nodes with 16-core PowerPC A2 processors that are able to handle 64 threads each. The system would include almost 8.4 million processing cores that are organized in 512 racks. The targeted performance is a peak of 107 PFlop/s.

The BlueGene/Q Sequoia supercomputer IBM is currently building for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will use about 1.6 million A2 processing cores in 96 racks. The patent claims that each processing node will consume about 30 watts of power, which puts the 107 PFlop/s system at only 15.7 MW. That is rather impressive for a system with more than 8 million CPU cores.

The patent suggests that IBM has big plans with BlueGene/Q and especially its 5D torus network that connects the computing nodes among each other. There was no information when such a 100+ PFlop/s system could become reality. Sequoia is scheduled to go online in 2012 with a peak performance of about 20 PFlop/s.

SOURCE via Conceivablytech

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