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Archive for the ‘Software’ Category

Chrome now easily opens email links in Gmail, thanks to some HTML5 magic

February 29th, 2012

Chrome now easily opens email links in Gmail, thanks to some HTML5 magic

The next time you open up Gmail in Chrome keep an eye out for the prompt above, which uses HTML5 to finally close the gap between the ways Google’s browser handles mailto: links and its popular email service. Our only question about the change is what took them so long? Using extensions or simply copying and pasting email addresses as Gmail blogger and software developer Michael Davidson has been doing were available workarounds, but they won’t be needed any longer — no DRM necessary. Hit the source link for more info on what it actually does and how Chrome allows site handler requests.

SOURCE via Google

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Mozilla rumored to debut LG-made Boot to Gecko device at MWC

February 25th, 2012

Mozilla rumored to debut LG-made Boot to Gecko device at MWC

Mozilla hasn’t exactly been quiet about the fact that it has some big stuff to show off at Mobile World Congress. We’ve already gotten a peek at Boot to Gecko and it’s announced it’ll be joining the app market fray. But, what we haven’t heard anything about just yet, is hardware. A mobile operating system and software outlet are only useful if you’ve got a physical platform to run it on. Now rumors are circulating that LG is in cahoots with the makers of Firefox and will be building developer hardware for for its fledgling OS. Mozilla CTO Brendan Eich has said publicly his foundation will be at MWC with “partners…” plural. Who exactly those ally companies are isn’t clear, but we’d say it’s safe to assume there is at least one hardware maker in the mix. And, if the sources at ExtremeTech are right, that manufacturer already has a rather busy schedule.

SOURCE via ExtremeTech

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Mozilla Labs Apps set to allow developer submissions for Mozilla Marketplace at MWC

February 24th, 2012

Mozilla Labs Apps set to allow developer submissions for Mozilla Marketplace at MWC

Been keeping up with Mozilla Labs’ Apps project? Today the company’s focused on developers, with pleasing news if you’ve been looking to get your app’s feet wet in it. In the coming weeks at Mobile World Congress, the Firefox maker will finally open its self-titled Marketplace’s doors for app submissions. If you’re unfamiliar, Mozilla’s been working to create an “operating system- and device-independent market,” based on its own APIs, HTML5 and other open source materials. The end result will be the ability to use said apps without being locked down by your devices and their respective app stores. The store is set to open up for consumer consumption later in the year, so now’s your chance to reserve your software’s spot and name on the list if you’re interested.

SOURCE via Mozilla

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Flash roadmap reveals new features, improved GPU support, lack of retirement plans

February 24th, 2012

Flash roadmap reveals new features, improved GPU support, lack of retirement plans

Flash for mobile may just be a spectator at its own wake at this point, but the desktop browser plug-in is still alive and (reasonably) well. In fact, Adobe has a host of plans for its flagship multimedia platform, as outlined in its 2012 roadmap. It all starts with 11.2, which should be landing sooner, rather than later, with support for right and left mouse clicks, multithreaded video decoding and improved GPU acceleration support. That will be followed by Cyril and Dolores, which will also expand the list of hardware-accelerated video cards, as well as improve overall performance and add a few welcome tweaks, like supporting keyboard input in full screen mode. Finally, in 2013, we’ll see the debut of Flash Next — a completely overhauled platform with major updates to the runtime core and ActionScript language that are designed to “meet the needs of developers over the next five to 10 years.” Check out the source for full details but, be warned — it’s PDF only.

SOURCE via Adobe (PDF)

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Google Docs presentations slides out of preview, adds import and comment options

February 24th, 2012

Google Docs presentations slides out of preview, adds import and comment options

The slide-making masses have spoken and Google’s dutifully listened. After launching presentations for Docs as a preview last October, the search giant’s making that editor ready for prime time with a few user-suggested tweaks in tow. In addition to the recently introduced slew of transitions, themes, tables and collaborative options, Mountain View’s now tossing in the ability to make, edit and resolve comments, send email notifications, as well as control read / write privileges for outside users. And don’t worry about your old documents getting lost in the shuffle; a new import setting will enable those visual gems to benefit from this new facelift. Check out the source below for a fuller walk-through or catch the instructional vid after the break.

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Apache outs version 2.4 of its HTTP server six years after last full release

February 24th, 2012

Apache outs version 2.4 of its HTTP server six years after last full release

It’s been half a dozen years since Apache last released a new version of its venerable HTTP server, but the day has finally come for version 2.4 to be unveiled to the world. Granted, the old Apache was doing fine — it’s been the most prolific web server in the world since the mid-nineties — but a bit of freshening up couldn’t hurt, right? Among the many changes are reduced memory usage, improved performance and efficiency, and more finely-tuned caching support for high-traffic sites. If you want to know more, check out the source link below for an overview and full feature list. Well, what are you waiting for, Tanto… jump on it!

SOURCE via Ars Technica

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Google responds to Microsoft’s claims of their Internet Explorer privacy settings issue

February 22nd, 2012

Google responds to Microsoft’s claims of their Internet Explorer privacy settings issue

Google’s Senior Vice President of Communications and Policy, Rachel Whetstone has now issued a statement in response to Microsoft’s blog post:

Microsoft omitted important information from its blog post today.

Microsoft uses a “self-declaration” protocol (known as “P3P”) dating from 2002 under which Microsoft asks websites to represent their privacy practices in machine-readable form. It is well known – including by Microsoft – that it is impractical to comply with Microsoft’s request while providing modern web functionality. We have been open about our approach, as have many other websites.

Today the Microsoft policy is widely non-operational. A 2010 research report indicated that over 11,000 websites were not issuing valid P3P policies as requested by Microsoft.

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Pulse Surface Controller System makes your air drumming more realistic

February 22nd, 2012

Pulse Surface Controller System makes your air drumming more realistic

The Pulse Surface Controller is a vibration-based musical instrument that finally puts those years of air drumming to use. It’s a small, piezo-based MIDI controller that lets you turn pretty much any surface into a musical instrument. The device has a built-in suction cup, comes with velcro straps and plugs into your computer’s microphone port. The fun really starts with the dedicated controller software, that converts your percussive punches to your virtual instrument of choice. You’re not limited to drums either, as you can map your taps to a velocity sensitive melodic generator to create musical tones and scales. Luckily you won’t have to sit on your hands to get one of these either, as the Pulse Surface Controller System is available now for $59, or you can tap-tap-tap the video after the break for a demo.

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Microsoft finds Google bypassed Internet Explorer’s privacy settings too, but it’s not alone

February 21st, 2012

Microsoft finds Google bypassed Internet Explorer's privacy settings too, but it's not alone

There was quite a stir sparked last week when it was revealed that Google was exploiting a loophole in a Apple’s Safari browser to track users through web ads, and that has now prompted a response from Microsoft’s Internet Explorer team, who unsurprisingly turned their attention to their own browser. In an official blog post today, they revealed that Google is indeed bypassing privacy settings in IE as well, although that’s only part of the story (more on that later).

As Microsoft explains at some length, Google took advantage of what it describes as a “nuance” in the P3P specification, which effectively allowed it to bypass a user’s privacy settings and track them using cookies — a different method than that used in the case of Safari, but one that ultimately has the same goal. Microsoft says it has contacted Google about the matter, but it’s offering a solution of its own in the meantime. It’ll require you to first upgrade to Internet Explorer 9 if you haven’t already, and then install a Tracking Protection List that will completely block any such attempts by Google — details on it can be found at the source link below.

As ZDNet’s Mary Jo Foley notes, however, Google isn’t the only company that was discovered to be taking advantage of the P3P loophole. Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University’s CyLab say they alerted Microsoft to the vulnerability in 2010, and just two days ago the director of the lab, Lorrie Faith Cranor, wrote about about the issue again on the TAP blog (sponsored by Microsoft, incidentally), detailing how Facebook and others also skirt IE’s ability to block cookies. Indeed, Facebook readily admits on its site that it does not have a P3P policy, explaining that the standard is “out of date and does not reflect technologies that are currently in use on the web,” and that “most websites” also don’t currently have P3P policies.

On that matter, Microsoft said in a statement to Foley that the “IE team is looking into the reports about Facebook,” but that it has “no additional information to share at this time.”

SOURCE via zdnet

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VLC 2.0 now available, offering faster decoding, a refreshed UI and experimental Blu-ray support

February 20th, 2012

VLC 2.0 now available, offering faster decoding, a refreshed UI and experimental Blu-ray support

The release candidate version slipped out a few days ago, but those waiting for the final release will be glad to know that version 2.0 of the open source VLC media player is now officially available for download. It’s being dubbed a “major” release of the software, and with good reason. In addition to some UI changes (a big change in the case of the Mac version), VLC 2.0 also brings with it faster decoding on multi-core processors, GPUs, and mobile hardware, and the ability to open yet more file formats, including a number HD formats used by professional users. Also making its debut is support for Blu-ray playback, although it’s being dubbed an “experimental” feature at this time. It also promises to fix “several hundred” bugs. Naturally, it remains completely free as ever — hit the source link below to download it for the platform of your choice.

SOURCE via VLC 2.0

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