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The Oatmeal does it: $850,000 raised for a Tesla Museum

August 23rd, 2012

The Oatmeal does it: $850,000 raised for a Tesla Museum

The Oatmeal’s campaign to raise cash helping Tesla Science Center purchase Wardenclyffe has hit its $850,000 target. The property, formerly the home of the scientist’s project to create wireless electricity can now be purchased with a matching grant from New York state. The charity is planning to build a museum on its original foundations, in a fitting tribute to the “Greatest Geek who ever lived.”

SOURCE via TneNextWeb

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BBC facing penalties for hosting Top Gear videos on YouTube

August 23rd, 2012

BBC facing penalties for hosting Top Gear videos on YouTube

If a corporate content provider in the U.S. wants to upload videos to YouTube, all it essentially needs to do is find someone who knows how to upload videos to YouTube. Then: profit! In the UK, it’s done differently – so much so that it sounds like everyone is confused. A regulatory body called The Authority for Television on Demand (ATVOD) oversees on-demand services, including content posted online on branded aggregator sites like Virgin Media as well as open sites like YouTube. Content providers like the BBC, Nickelodeon and MTV that show on-demand content that is “television like,” that are editorially responsible for the content, and that make it available to the public need to pay a yearly fee to ATVOD.

Here’s where things get sticky: The BBC posted clips of its Top Gear and BBC Food programs on its YouTube channel, each clip less than ten minutes. According to The Telegraph, it didn’t check with ATVOD about as to its obligations. The ATVOD checked out the clips and said ‘these are television-like, so you owe us £2,900 for each channel (that’s about $4,600 USD).’ The BBC said that clips of less than ten minutes – a fraction of the length of the program on television – are short-form content being watched by people on the move, and thus not television-like.

The ATVOD responded to this by basically saying “bollocks.” Since the BBC content in question satisfies the ATVOD’s entire checklist for matters it regulates, the clips in question are “television-like” enough to justify the fee. The BBC joins a long line of media outlets including newspapers and magazines questioning ATVOD decisions, such as rulings that a company that makes a show is responsible for the editorial content of an on-demand show and needs to pay ATVOD as opposed to the broadcaster of the show paying ATVOD. It isn’t just big guns that ATVOD goes after, either, its call for licensing fees having shut down more than one independent site offering content like amateur short films. The BBC is appealing, and it looks like clarification will have to come from the UK courts.

SOURCE via Telegraph UK

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Instagram 3.0 adds Photo Maps, infinite scrolling and speed improvements

August 17th, 2012

Instagram 3.0 adds Photo Maps, infinite scrolling and speed improvements

Wondering if that Facebook acquisition would slow down the pace of innovation at Instagram? Perhaps v3.0 will answer that. The famed photo sharing network — now some 80 million users deep — is detailing its latest user interface overhaul today, and geolocation is at the heart of it. Lining up with our own feelings on the benefits of geotagging and the usefulness of tagged photos from an archive / diary perspective, the newest edition of the app introduces a Photo Maps view. As the name implies, it overlays photos with a map underneath, giving people a far more visual look at what they were seeing at a given point on Earth (or Mars, assuming Curiosity hasn’t reached its data limit this month).

Beyond that, the app includes “multi-line caption editing, more streamlined photo uploading, speed improvements and infinite scroll,” according to TechCrunch. Interestingly, the Twitter “Find Friends” feature has been yanked in the latest build due to Twitter shutting off its API to the company last month. If you’re wondering about a master plan for Photo Maps, it’s pretty simple; just as you’d tune into #nbcfail on Twitter to read the latest musings about the Summer Olympics, hovering over London in Instagram could give you a highly filtered look at what kind of photos are emerging from an event in real time. And really, who wouldn’t want to see 807 sepia-infused 1:1 shots of Usain Bolt? Per usual, you’ll find the demo vid after the break.

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Amazon recruits 5,000 UK corner stores for ‘Collect+’ delivery service

August 17th, 2012

Amazon recruits 5,000 UK corner stores for 'Collect+' delivery service

Convenience stores, cornershops, newsagents, call them what you will — nearly 5,000 local businesses in the UK have now been signed up by Amazon to receive and look after its customers’ precious packages. The “Collect+” scheme is currently on trial but The Telegraph reports it’s expected to roll out across Britain, where it’ll add one more delivery option for those who — for their own strange and inexplicable reasons — are rarely at home between 9am and 5pm.

SOURCE via Telegraph UK

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Facebook starts really, truly deleting removed photos

August 17th, 2012

Facebook starts really, truly deleting removed photos

For those who haven’t kept track, Facebook has had a years-long history of only maybe-sort-of-more-or-less purging our photos: they could be removed from a profile, but they would sometimes float around the site’s content delivery networks for months or years, just waiting for a prospective employer to spot those embarrassing frosh week snapshots by accident. As Ars Technica discovered through experiments and official remarks, that problem should now be solved. In the wake of a months-long photo storage system migration and an updated deletion policy, Facebook now won’t let removed photos sit for more than 30 days in the content network stream before they’re scrubbed once and for all. The improved reaction time isn’t as rapid as for a service like Instagram, where photos vanish almost immediately, but it might be a lifesaver for privacy advocates — or just anyone who’s ever worn a lampshade on their head in a moment of insobriety.

SOURCE via Ars Technica

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Judge rules Facebook users can share friends’ profiles with the feds

August 17th, 2012

Judge rules Facebook users can share friends' profiles with the feds

It’s not the backdoor access that the FBI has been pushing for, but US District Judge William Pauley III has now ruled that it and other law enforcement agencies are entitled to view your Facebook profile if one of your “friends” gives them permission to do so. As GigaOm reports, that ruling comes as part of a New York City racketeering trial, in which one of the accused, Melvin Colon, had tried to suppress evidence turned up on Facebook that led to his indictment. That information was obtained through an informant who gave investigators access to the profile, something that Colon had argued violated his rights against unreasonable searches and seizures under the Fourth Amendment. In the ruling, Judge Pauley dismissed that claim, likening the Facebook access instead to a phone wiretap in which one person on the call allows the government to monitor it — a practice that has been ruled constitutional. GigaOm also has the ruling in its entirety at the source link below for those interested.

SOURCE via GigaOm

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Google, Mozilla and Wikimedia projects get Maya language translations at one-day ‘translathon’

August 15th, 2012

Google, Mozilla and Wikimedia projects get Maya language translations at one-day 'translathon'

Twenty native speakers of Yucatec, Mexico’s most widely spoken Mayan tongue, met last Thursday to help bring the language to Google, Mozilla and Wikimedia projects. The event, dubbed Mozilla Translathon 2012, was organized to provide translations for Firefox, Google’s Endangered Languages Project, the WikiMedia software that powers Wikipedia and 500 crowdsourced articles, to boot. Finding the right words, however, can often be a tricky proposition. “There are words that can’t be translated,” Mozilla’s Mexico representative Julio Gómez told CNNMéxico. “In Maya, file doesn’t exist. Tab doesn’t exist.” Gómez continues to explain that the group may keep foreign words as-is, or find other terms to represent the same ideas. In addition to software localization, it’s believed that the effort could allow Maya speakers to “recover their identity and their cultural heritage,” according to Wikimedia México president Iván Martínez. If you’d like to peruse wiki articles in the indigenous language, check out the source links below.

SOURCE via TheNextWeb

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Internet Archive makes 1 million public-domain files available with BitTorrent

August 13th, 2012

Internet Archive makes 1 million public-domain files available with BitTorrent

The Internet Archive is making over a million pieces of archived content available through BitTorrent. The site’s collection of public-domain books, audio and video is being added and tracked — with Asimov’s Foundation Trilogy, Plan 9 From Outer Space and Night of the Living Dead among the top 25 most popular downloads. Unfortunately, it’ll be a while until Manos: The Hands of Fate falls out of copyright, but it’s something we’ve got to look forward to.

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FTC and Facebook settle privacy dispute, skip the fine

August 11th, 2012

FTC and Facebook settle privacy dispute, skip the fine

Well, Mark Zuckerberg is finally trying to make things right after admitting to a “bunch of mistakes” when dealing with user privacy on his juggernaut of a social network. The FTC and Facebook had agreed to settle the dispute in November, and now the final details of the deal have been ironed out. Noticeably missing from the list of concessions is cash. The government isn’t asking Facebook to cough up any dough as part of the settlement — avoiding the sort of hefty fine that Google recently found itself on the wrong end of. The company will, however, have drastically revamp how it handles user data and subject itself to privacy audits every two years for 20 years. Customers will now be provided with “clear and prominent” warnings any time information is shared. And, before anything can be shared, users must give express consent to for that information to be distributed. Ideally, these measures would have been in place on day one, but we’ll take what we can get at this point.

SOURCE via CNET

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Dropbox now lets you print documents at FedEx Office retail stores, online too

August 9th, 2012

Dropbox now lets you print documents at FedEx Office retail stores, online too

The cloud locker behemoth that is Dropbox has taken to Twitter to announce it’s now allowing users to “easily” print documents at FedEx Office stores, both retail and online. But just how “easy” is it, really? Well, the physical deal’s fairly simple: head over to the nearest FedEx Office shop and self-serve yourself to a friendly three-step method, which includes picking Dropbox as the service of choice (there’s also Box and Google Docs), entering the appropriate credentials and, naturally, selecting whatever doc you’re looking to print out. Unfortunately, both companies failed to mention how much the handy service will cost, but we can’t imagine it’d be much different — if at all– than the fees you’re accustomed to now.

SOURCE via Dropbox (Twitter)

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