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The BEST and Most Affordable iPhone Speaker Ever!

January 18th, 2013

The BEST and Most Affordable iPhone Speaker Ever!

Needless for me to show you the steps to make this :D Eco friendly, cheap, materials can be found most places.

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Bowers & Wilkins intros classy A7 and A5 AirPlay speakers, leaves out the 30-pin dock

September 24th, 2012

Bowers & Wilkins intros classy A7 and A5 AirPlay speakers, leaves out the 30-pin dock

When it comes to Apple-focused audio wares, Bowers & Wilkins makes some of the of the ritiziest options available. Expanding on its its existing speaker range, the company has introduced a duo of new AirPlay speakers dubbed as the A5 ($500) and A7 ($800). Both HiFi boxes are nearly identical from the outside (aside from the size difference), and feature the same black and silver aesthetic as the MM-1 media speakers. The A7 nets you a duo of 25-watt 1-inch Nautilus “tube-loaded” tweeters” (just like the MM-1s), two 25-watt 3-inch drivers for the mid-range and a 50-watt 6-inch woofer, while the A5 shrinks things by forgoing a woofer and using a smaller speaker array of two 20-watt tweeters and two 20-watt mid-range drivers. The speakers on both units are independently driven, and both systems feature an “audiophile-grade” DAC that’ll upscale music streams to a maximum 24-bit / 96kHz sample rate. As you’d expect, the units feature WiFi and Ethernet connectivity and 3.5mm inputs for hooking in sans wireless, but it’s worth noting these audio boxes lack 30-pin docks — at least you still get a remote. Check out the video after the break for a detailed look at both, and the source link below for all the juicy details.

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Jarre Aeroskull speaker dock packs dual 15-watt woofers, recently departed Apple Dock Connector

September 22nd, 2012

Jarre Aeroskull speaker dock packs dual 15-watt woofers, recently departed Apple Dock Connector

Just in time for Halloween, Jarre’s new Aeroskull dock embodies 70 watts of total power in a human-like cranium, complete with a pair of speaker-packing shades. Jarre is showing off the colorful chrome tune machine in black, white, blue, green, orange, pink, purple and yellow finishes, with a matching IR bone remote to boot. With a tinted lens appearance, the permanently affixed sunglasses actually contain two 15-watt speakers, with a 40-watt subwoofer occupying the skull’s rear. The lofty £349 (about $565) sticker price will net you some of the latest technologies, including Bluetooth audio support and a standard 3.5mm audio input, but Apple’s new Lightning port is notably absent, with a good-as-dead Dock Connector mounted up top, instead. With 70 watts of power and Jarre’s backing, this seemingly bizarre rig may actually offer decent performance. You’ll need to wait until its October ship date to see for yourself, but if a skeletal sound system is on your list of must-haves, you can rest in peace knowing that you have but weeks to live (with your current spirited setup).

SOURCE via Pocket-Lint

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JBL freshens its portable speakers with Micro II, Bluetooth-toting Flip and Micro Wireless

September 12th, 2012

JBL freshens its portable speakers with Micro II, Bluetooth-toting Flip and Micro Wireless

JBL has been on a wireless speaker kick lately — it might as well throw some truly portable models into the equation. Accordingly, two of the three speakers it’s shipping today, the Flip and Micro Wireless, sport Bluetooth audio and a 5-hour battery to cut the cord. The Flip (seen above) is the multi-talented athlete of the bunch: its design can work either upright or on its side to stuff into small spaces, and a built-in mic provides speakerphone duties. The Micro Wireless’ puck shape isn’t as clever, but it fits a standard 3.5mm input jack and space to clip to a carabiner or lanyard. Both these and the Micro Wireless’ strictly wired counterpart, the Micro II, have a bass port to improve the low-end frequencies that are so often missing in this class of speaker. Prices may be the real incentives here: the Flip is the most expensive of the trio at $99, while the Micro Wireless and Micro II are even lighter on the wallet at respective $59 and $39 price points.

SOURCE via JBL

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Marshall’s Hanwell HiFi speaker is bred from guitar amps, at-home with your PMP

September 3rd, 2012

Marshall's Hanwell HiFi speaker is bred from guitar amps, at-home with your PMP

It’s been a year since the legendary guitar amp and speaker makers at Marshall Amplification made a splash in consumer audio with its Marshall Headphones spin-off (Zound / Urbanears). In commemorence of the amplification division’s 50th aniversary, both have announced the Hanwell: Marshall’s first speaker rig that’s made for a counter-top instead of a festival stage. Combo guitar amp / speaker meets HiFi speaker. Most anyone who plays guitar, or has seen the likes of Slash and Nigel Tufnel shredding it up, will immediately recognize the iconic Marshall design ethic down to its iconic plastic nameplate on the front grill and gold accents.

Marshall's Hanwell HiFi speaker is bred from guitar amps, at-home with your PMP

There’s no major tech at play inside of the system, but with looks this cool it’s not like it matters — hopefully, the sound quality will match. Up top there’s a familiar panel housing a 3.5mm input, power toggle and knobs for bass, treble and volume, while internally you’ll find a duo of long-throw woofers and tweeters. The cab itself is made from wood and wrapped in black vinyl tolex like its bigger JCM siblings — heck, it even comes with a coiled audio cable. There’s no specific information beyond all of that such as pricing and availability though.

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Sennheiser unveils HDVA 600 analog headphone amp, asks for $1,600

September 3rd, 2012

Sennheiser unveils HDVA 600 analog headphone amp, asks for $1,600

Along with a few IFA 2012 announcements, Sennheiser peeled back the wraps from its HDVA 600 headphone amp, an analog flavor of the previously unveiled HDVD 800. Like its sibling, the freshly revealed hardware sports a glass panel for peeking at its innards and an anodized aluminum exterior, but leaves the digital inputs behind. While the 800 carries a hefty $2,000 price tag, the 600 will set customers back a smaller — but still substantial — sum of $1,600. Both units are tailored for the likes of Senn’s flagship HD 800 headphones, so they should easily be able to drive cans that require up to 300-ohms.

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Logitech unveils new Ultimate Ears range, includes $99 mobile boombox

August 29th, 2012

Logitech unveils new Ultimate Ears range, includes $99 mobile boombox

Logitech’s Ultimate Ears marque is unveiling a plethora of new products designed to keep you smothered in music from the moment you wake up. First up is a trio of speakers that push tunes from your smartphone, including a $180 WiFi-connected Smart Radio, a $250 Boombox and a $100 Mobile Boombox, the latter of which seems like it could take on Jawbone’s Jambox and win on price alone.

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Sennheiser boasts anti-counterfeit efforts, unveils new authentication technologies

August 23rd, 2012

Sennheiser boasts anti-counterfeit efforts, unveils new authentication technologies

You know Sennheiser’s pissed when it holds a press conference just to talk about its anti-counterfeit efforts. In Guangzhou yesterday, the German audio company brought along two executives to debut its new authentication technologies on its retail packaging: a shiny Tesa PrioSpot authenticity label plus a “fool-proof” online look-up system. For the former, President of Corporate Services Volker Batels claims it’s treated as securely as one would with cash money, in the sense that it has many visible and invisible features.

There’s also a QR code plus its corresponding label ID printed below the foil, and scanning the former or entering the latter on qr-sennheiser.com returns a virtual copy of the foil label plus a visual description. If what you have matches the label on the screen then hakuna matata. But if the code’s been looked up many times already, the website will also give you a warning like in the screenshot after the break — chances are the label’s been duplicated, so potential buyers should always check this before handing the money over.

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Jawbone takes a cue from Colorware, will let customers order the Jambox speaker in custom colors

August 23rd, 2012

Jawbone takes a cue from Colorware, will let customers order the Jambox speaker in custom colors

Want a blue-and-black Bluetooth speaker to match your Engadget t-shirt, messenger bag and whatever other paraphernalia you have lying around? You’re in luck: Jawbone is about to start accepting orders for the Jambox speaker in custom colors. All told, you’ll be able to choose from 13 shades for the grill, and nine for the end caps. Jawbone says it can see customers choosing school and team colors, not that you need an excuse to want an orange piece of kit. The personalization is free of charge, meaning the price of the speaker is still $200. The only downside, so far as we can tell, is that the Big Jambox isn’t included. For now, the site is only open to select users (i.e., loyal customers who have participated in company forums, surveys and such), but starting August 28th it’ll be open to everybody. In the meantime, which of you has the cojones to order it in purple and yellow?

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Tritton’s Pro+ 5.1 headset goes up for pre-order, promises gamers ‘true 5.1′ for $200

August 17th, 2012

Tritton's Pro+ 5.1 headset goes up for pre-order, promises gamers 'true 5.1' for $200

Thought Tritton was satisfied with only pumping out Xbox-licensed gaming headsets in the last year? Fret not ye’ PS3 and PC gamers, instead, say hello to its latest cross-platform unit, the AX Pro+. Although its color scheme is similar to the Dolby Headphone-enabled AX 720 virtual surround sound headset, the moniker pits it as a follow up to the AX Pro. Like its predecessor, the Pro+ sports a trio of drivers and one subwoofer in each of its earcups, aiming to offer “true 5.1 surround sound.” Among other design tweaks, its cups can rotate flat for added comfort (a sorely missed feature on the original), and the drivers have been repositioned for “superior surround sound separation and improved bass response.” An included Dolby decoder box handles its connections, while the headset’s inline remote allows you to adjust each driver’s individual volume level, the balance of game / voice audio, and enable voice monitoring through its detachable mic. Better yet, the whole setup is powered by one wall plug, rather than two as was the annoyance with the older model. Discrete 5.1 headsets haven’t impressed us in the past, but you can pre-order the Pro+ for $200 from Tritton if you’re willing to give its cramped surround sound setup a try during Call of Duty fragging sessions come this September.

SOURCE via Tritton

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